Master's projects

We are looking for highly motivated Master's students on most of our current research projects. Please contact us using This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or, if you have already identified an experiment to which you would like to participate, contact directly the senior scientist in charge of it.

We are also looking for two Master's students who would be working on a new project that we are starting with the semiconductor company Infineon:

Master’s opportunities with Innsbruck University and Infineon

Quantum computers which use trapped atomic ions as quantum bits (qubits) are emerging as a promising route to revolutionising the way some computations can be done. As the present proof-of-principle experiments are scaled to many more qubits, trapped ion quantum computers are set to transform the kinds of problems we can tackle for certain systems, and thereby shed new light a variety of physical questions. Fabricating a scalable trapped ion quantum computer requires, on the one hand, expertise in ion trapping and, on the other, mastery of state-of-the-art fabrication techniques. To this end Innsbruck University is teaming up with Infineon in a partnership to bring these two areas into collaborative contact.

Two positions are available for Master’s students. These will be primarily based with Infineon in Villach, with some time spent in Innsbruck for trap testing. Compensation will be provided to cover expenses such as accommodation and travel. The details of the two projects are provided below. If you are interested, send an e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., including a curriculum vitae and a short motivation for your interest in the project. Please include the phrase “Infineon and Innsbruck” in the e-mail’s subject field.

Project 1: On-chip filters for surface ion traps

To be useful for quantum information processing, trapped ions must be very well isolated from external noise sources which could disturb their quantum state. To exclude electronic noise on the electrodes, filters must be placed very close to the trap – ideally on the trap chip itself. This project involves the design of a suitable filter circuit, fabricating the components on the same chip as a microfabricated ion trap, and then testing the filters’ performance.

Project 2: On-chip radio-frequency electronics for surface ion traps

The ion traps most often used for quantum information processing require radio-frequency (RF) voltages to confine the ions. Traditional resonators for generating such voltages can be tens of centimetres long, and situated tens of centimetres away from the trap. To make the system scalable the RF drive must be miniaturised to that it can be fabricated on the chip, directly next to the trap. This project involves the design of a suitable RF drive circuit, fabricating the components on the same chip as a microfabricated ion trap, and then testing the drive circuit’s performance.

Logo Infineon

[Deutsche Version]